This series has passed. Please check the CUAHSI YouTube Channel here to view recordings. 

CUAHSI's 2020 Cyberseminar Series: 

Waterhackweek

Organizers:

Christina Bandaragoda, Tony Castronova, Erkan Istanbulluoglu, Bart Nijssen, Anthony Arendt, Emilio Mayorga

Description

Studies of water and environmental systems are becoming increasingly complex and require the integration of knowledge across multiple domains. At the same time, technological advances have enabled the collection of massive quantities of data for studying earth system changes. Fully leveraging these datasets and software tools requires fundamentally new approaches in the way researchers store, access and process data. Waterhackweek, supported by the National Science Foundation Cybertraining program, serves the national interest by motivating a culture shift within the hydrologic and more broadly earth science communities toward open and reproducible software practices that will enhance interdisciplinary collaboration and increase capacity for addressing complex science challenges around the availability, risks and use of water. The 2019 cyberseminar series consisted of presentations from the CyberTraining investigators and research software developers, each focusing on a specific water-related use cases, tool, or library. These recordings are one component of a library of learning resources which consist of both introductory and advanced concepts that are relevant to a wide range of water and informatics use-cases, e.g. publishing large datasets, running numerical models, organizing collaborative research projects, and meeting journal requirements by following open data standards. The goal of the 2020 series is to orient the incoming Waterhackweek (March 23-27, 2020) community for continued learning at the in-person capstone event in which their skills and creativity will be used to explore innovative issues in water research using cyberinfrastructure and data science. Because these topics and technologies are also relevant to the broader water science community, the series is designed so that each seminar will introduce suggested learning resources for software technologies, and/or scientific approaches used by water science researchers that are focused around a central theme. Participants are invited to actively participate in the cyberseminar by engaging in Q/A sessions with seminar panelists about their diverse experiences, as well as questions about learning resources provided on each theme. We welcome all undergraduate, graduate, and early career scientists to join us in this public cyberseminar series.

Be sure to watch the waterhackweek information session here!

Dates, Speakers, and Topics:

  • January 23, 2020: Collaboration with Teams, Users, & Stakeholders | Nicole Gasparini, Tulane University | Kyle Combes, Emily Lepert, Vicky McDermott, & Charlie Weiss - Olin College SCOPE Team | Christina Bandaragoda, University of Washington
  • January 30, 2020: Publishing Data and Research | Emilio Mayorga, Senior Oceanographer - University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory | Amber Jones, Research Engineer and PhD Student - Utah State University, Utah Water Research Laboratory | Jezra Beaulieu, Water Resources Specilaist - Nooksack Indian Tribe
  • February 6, 2020: Community Repositories | Greg Tucker, Professor Geological Sciences - University of Colorado, Boulder | Jerad Bales, Executive Director - Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc. 
  • February 13, 2020: Publishing Interactive Code | Tim Cockerill | Scott Black | Amanda Tan 
  • February 20, 2020: Modeling and Big Compute | Anand Padmanabhan, Senior Research Scientist - Cyberinfrastructure and Geospatial Information Laboratory | Joe Hamman, Project Scientist I - Climate and Global Dynamics Lab | Eric Hutton, Senior Professional Scientist, Chief SOftware Engineer - CSDMS
  • February 27, 2020: Scaling Climate Data and Hydrologic Processes 
  • March 5, 2020: Big Research Needs & Waterhackweek Community Projects   
  • March 12, 2020: Waterhackweek Tutorial Pitch (sign up to introduce your software, toolkit, or curriculum!) 

Presentation Abstracts and Recordings

  • January 23, 2020

    Collaboration with Teams, Users, & Stakeholders

    This seminar will focus on addressing large complex problems in water research with diverse teams. In theory, the bigger teams and more diverse the collaborations, the more research advancements we will make. Does that mean our research software teams should operate like tech companies? How can we design and build shared software that actually works, e.g. online, interactively, etc. ?  How are customers and students different than users and stakeholders? This seminar includes perspectives from undergraduate students, faculty professors and research scientists on these questions.

    Panelists:

    • Nicole Gasparini, Tulane University
    • Kyle Combes
    • Emily Lepert 
    • Vicky McDermott
    • Charlie Weiss - Olin College SCOPE Team
    • Christina Bandaragoda, University of Washington

    View the recording of this webinar here!

  • January 30, 2020

    Publishing Data and Research 

    In this seminar we discuss the frontier we will discuss is how metadata enables earth science students and researchers to meet emerging expectations and standards in data publication. We will hear from a diverse panel of experts on this topic from intersecting perspectives that range from academic developers, tribal/government users, and professional software developers. Panelists and participants in this session will be invited to consider: Is Metadata a gift to the future? Is there a chance that metadata may also save our species from extinction?

    Facilitators: Tony Castronova, Hydrologic Scientist - CUAHSI | Christina Bandaragoda, Senior Research Scientist - University of Washington, Waterhackweek Program Director 

    Panelists: 

    • Emilio Mayorga, Senior Oceanographer - University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory 
    • Amber Jones, Research Engineer and PhD Student - Utah State University, Utah Water Research Laboratory 
    • Jezra Beaulieu, Water Resources Specialist - Nooksack Indian Tribe

    View the recording of this webinar here!

  • February 6, 2020

    Community Repositories

    Uploading data to a website is not too hard, but deciding where to publish the data and code and which standards to follow is becoming increasingly complicated.  In this seminar we will provide some background on where hydrologists, geoscientists and engineers are publishing data, models, and research software. This topic builds on previous seminars addressing large complex problems in water research with diverse teams, collaborations, and making choices that support reproducible science.  If my data is stored in one location, how do you bridge in time to future research? How do I bridge in space to other experiments across federal and academic science communities? If my data is all stored in one community data repository, for how long will it be there? Can republish it somewhere else? When will the software version be  out of date? within one year of DOI publishing in a journal? What can I expect for the future of my research products? 

    Facilitators: Tony Castronova, Hydrologic Scientist - CUAHSI  | Christina Bandaragoda, Senior Research Scientist - University of Washington, Waterhackweek Director 

    Panelists: 

    • Greg Tucker, Professor Geological Sciences - University of Colorado, Boulder 
    • Jerad Bales, Executive Director - Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc. 

    View the recording of this webinar here

  • February 13, 2020

    Publishing Interactive Code

    Once upon a time, “reproducible science” was trendy jargon that was adopted by many scientists in the hopes of satisfying data management plans and disseminating their research. Years later, it’s clear that few scientists were successful in ultimately making their data reproducible (Stagge et.al, 2019). Ensuring that published research is reproducible is becoming a necessary attribute of becoming a responsible researcher, thanks to initiatives such as F.A.I.R (Findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) which place emphasis on workflows and tools that support reproducible science. The design, development, and use of interactive code environments play a critical role in supporting these FAIR concepts. In this seminar, we will investigate how cyberinfrastructure is actively being developed and used in scientific applications.

    Stagge, James H., David E. Rosenberg, Adel M. Abdallah, Hadia Akbar, Nour A. Attallah, and Ryan James. "Assessing data availability and research reproducibility in hydrology and water resources." Scientific data 6 (2019): 190030.

    Panelists:

    • Tim Cockerill, Director of User Services -  Texas Advanced Computing Center
    • Scott Black, Senior Programmer/Analyst - Utah State University
    • Amanda Tan, Data Science Fellow, E-Science Institute - University of Washington 

    View the recording of this webinar here

  • February 20, 2020

    Modeling and Big Compute

    Once upon a time, “reproducible science” was as simple as sharing code and posting the data online. But with big datasets and big models and complex workflows, the computational limits of reproducing workflows used in modeling experiments can turn a testable hypothesis into a behemoth intractable numerical nightmare. Our panelists work tirelessly to build communities and online platforms that make computational resources and data accessible to more researchers. Learn more about fairy tales that are being written to end to our computational tribulations and enable more scientific research.

    Panelists: 

    • Joe Hamman - Pangeo 
    • Anand Padmanabhan- XSEDE
    • Eric Hutton - CSDMS and LandLab

    View the recording of this webinar here

  • February 27, 2020

    Scaling Climate Data and Hydrologic Processes

    Human activists disrupt climate and the environment, and extreme weather events and the environmental. 

    • Can we accurately quantify the uncertainty in climate data and its effect on modeled hydrologic processes? Can we clearly explain these uncertainties to the general public? 
    • Is it realistic to use existing climate datasets and methods to inform human decisions at local scales? What are the current shortcomings and/or pitfalls in doing so? 
    • What is the frontier of climate data and scaling methods? What areas of\ research will have the most dramatics impact on the way humans adapt to changing climate? 

    View the recording of this webinar here

  • March 5, 2020

    Big Research Needs & Waterhackweek Community Projects

    "What is a Waterhackweek project, and where do I fit in?" In this cyberseminar, we'll provide an overview of what to expect while working with a team at Waterhackweek, discuss the range of possibilities for projects and their outcomes, and exampole projects from Waterhackweek 2019. We invite discussion and questions from attendees about their project ideas, data sets they'd like to look at, or topics they'd like to gain experience with through thte projects. 

    View the recording of this webinar here!

  • March 12, 2020

    Waterhackweek Tutorial Pitch (sign up to introduce your software, toolkit, or curriculum!)